Sunday, 20 April 2014

Easter Bunny Cream Cheese Pound Cake


I haven't been this excited about Easter for nearly 20 years.  It's the first year we're in our new house, the first time we're having friends and family over for Easter dinner, and most importantly, the first year my little boy will really understand what the Easter Bunny is!

I've gone a bit overboard with the Easter goodies this year.  I'm pretty sure I've got enough chocolate foil eggs to stock a Tesco Express.  When I came home last weekend with yet more Easter stuff, my husband remarked "I've never seen anyone with so much Easter stuff before". I've got Easter baskets, Easter bubbles, Easter eggs, Easter bunnies, bunny ears, bunny bubbles, chirping chicks, and tissue grass.  You name it, I've got it! 



The only thing missing was an Easter cake.  I needed something for dessert to serve our guests, and I had settled on making a strawberry pie but I knew my husband would never forgive me if I didn't have a second option. He hates fruit. Seriously - who hates fruit?!? I wasn't quite sure what to make, but after careful consideration I settled on the most appropriate cake choice I could - The Easter Bunny!  


This was the first carved cake I've made, so I also had to decide on new cake recipe that was moist and flavourful, but still dense enough to carve easily. A regular sponge cake like a Victoria Sponge is too light and fluffy to carve, and would likely crumble if you tried.  I needed something with a nice tight crumb structure, so after much deliberation I settled on a cream cheese pound cake recipe (similar to a UK Madeira cake) from Southern Living Magazine.  It was perfect.  The recipe made just the right amount for my Easter Bunny cake (three 6 inch shallow rounds, and one extra deep 5 inch round, plus  a 6 inch square pan for my husband to pick at).  The pound cake carved like a dream, and allowed for me to shave off the thinnest of pieces until I got the exact shape I was looking for.

I'm not going to lie, the whole process for making this cake took ages - it took me about 3 days from start to finish (I'm obviously not a professional cake decorator lol!)  On the first day I made the icing (Malibu lemon), and baked the cakes before popping them in the fridge to firm up before carving.  On the second day I filled the cakes with the icing and some lemon curd in between each layer, and then carved the cakes until I was happy with the shape. I covered the iced cake in fondant, made all of the little flowers and Easter eggs, and then made my bunny's ears. After all, no Easter Bunny is complete without a set of big white and pink bunny ears! On the third day I finished off the cake by making an adorable little fondant chick - complete with floral Easter bonnet, a fondant carrot, I pipped the grass onto the base, and attached the bunny's nose, eyes, ears and fluffy tail.



This cake really was a labor of love.  It was a great excuse for me to bake a cake and try out loads of new techniques.  I'm most pleased with my adorable little Easter chick!  I didn't actually stick her down to the fondant cake board, so I'll be placing her in my china cabinet once we finish eating the bunny cake.  



Traditionally pound cake is either baked in a bundt or loaf pan, and served on it's own or with a side of berries and whipped cream.  It's a wonderfully dense and flavourful cake that goes  perfectly with a cup of tea.  I just know you're going to love this cake as much as I did, whether you bake it in a regular cake tin, or carve it into something spectacular.


Cream Cheese Pound Cake
Originally from Southern Living Magazine, 2001

Ingredients

1 1/2 Cups (340g) Butter, softened at room temp
1 (8-ounce) Package 
(225g) Cream Cheese, softened at room temp 
3 Cups (675g) Sugar
6 Large Eggs
3 Cups (375) Plain Flour
1/8 tsp Salt
1 Tbsp Vanilla Extract

Instructions

1.  Preheat oven to 300ºF (150ºC). In a medium bowl, combine the flour and salt together and set aside.

2.  In a large bowl beat the butter and cream cheese at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add the sugar, and beat well (about 4 mins) but make sure not to over beat.

3.  Add the eggs 1 at a time, beating until combined before adding the next egg.

4.  Gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture, beating at low speed until just blended after each addition. Stir in vanilla.

5.  Pour the batter into a greased and floured 10-inch Bundt pan, or parchment lined cake tins (if using).  Bake for 1 hour and 40 minutes, or until a wooden skewer inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 10 to 15 minutes, and then remove from pan and let cool completely on wire rack.

The cake went down a treat with everyone, and even though it was a bit of a shame to cut my little bunny's bum off, I loved how easy it was to slice, and that I could see each delicious layer!





If you're looking for more Easter treats to bake, why not try my colourful Mini Easter Egg Cakes baked inside of real eggs!




Easter Bunny Cream Cheese Pound Cake


I haven't been this excited about Easter for nearly 20 years.  It's the first year we're in our new house, the first time we're having friends and family over for Easter dinner, and most importantly, the first year my little boy will really understand what the Easter Bunny is!

I've gone a bit overboard with the Easter goodies this year.  I'm pretty sure I've got enough chocolate foil eggs to stock a Tesco Express.  When I came home last weekend with yet more Easter stuff, my husband remarked "I've never seen anyone with so much Easter stuff before". I've got Easter baskets, Easter bubbles, Easter eggs, Easter bunnies, bunny ears, bunny bubbles, chirping chicks, and tissue grass.  You name it, I've got it! 



The only thing missing was an Easter cake.  I needed something for dessert to serve our guests, and I had settled on making a strawberry pie but I knew my husband would never forgive me if I didn't have a second option. He hates fruit. Seriously - who hates fruit?!? I wasn't quite sure what to make, but after careful consideration I settled on the most appropriate cake choice I could - The Easter Bunny!  


This was the first carved cake I've made, so I also had to decide on new cake recipe that was moist and flavourful, but still dense enough to carve easily. A regular sponge cake like a Victoria Sponge is too light and fluffy to carve, and would likely crumble if you tried.  I needed something with a nice tight crumb structure, so after much deliberation I settled on a cream cheese pound cake recipe (similar to a UK Madeira cake) from Southern Living Magazine.  It was perfect.  The recipe made just the right amount for my Easter Bunny cake (three 6 inch shallow rounds, and one extra deep 5 inch round, plus  a 6 inch square pan for my husband to pick at).  The pound cake carved like a dream, and allowed for me to shave off the thinnest of pieces until I got the exact shape I was looking for.

I'm not going to lie, the whole process for making this cake took ages - it took me about 3 days from start to finish (I'm obviously not a professional cake decorator lol!)  On the first day I made the icing (Malibu lemon), and baked the cakes before popping them in the fridge to firm up before carving.  On the second day I filled the cakes with the icing and some lemon curd in between each layer, and then carved the cakes until I was happy with the shape. I covered the iced cake in fondant, made all of the little flowers and Easter eggs, and then made my bunny's ears. After all, no Easter Bunny is complete without a set of big white and pink bunny ears! On the third day I finished off the cake by making an adorable little fondant chick - complete with floral Easter bonnet, a fondant carrot, I pipped the grass onto the base, and attached the bunny's nose, eyes, ears and fluffy tail.



This cake really was a labor of love.  It was a great excuse for me to bake a cake and try out loads of new techniques.  I'm most pleased with my adorable little Easter chick!  I didn't actually stick her down to the fondant cake board, so I'll be placing her in my china cabinet once we finish eating the bunny cake.  



Traditionally pound cake is either baked in a bundt or loaf pan, and served on it's own or with a side of berries and whipped cream.  It's a wonderfully dense and flavourful cake that goes  perfectly with a cup of tea.  I just know you're going to love this cake as much as I did, whether you bake it in a regular cake tin, or carve it into something spectacular.


Cream Cheese Pound Cake
Originally from Southern Living Magazine, 2001

Ingredients

1 1/2 Cups (340g) Butter, softened at room temp
1 (8-ounce) Package 
(225g) Cream Cheese, softened at room temp 
3 Cups (675g) Sugar
6 Large Eggs
3 Cups (375) Plain Flour
1/8 tsp Salt
1 Tbsp Vanilla Extract

Instructions

1.  Preheat oven to 300ºF (150ºC). In a medium bowl, combine the flour and salt together and set aside.

2.  In a large bowl beat the butter and cream cheese at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add the sugar, and beat well (about 4 mins) but make sure not to over beat.

3.  Add the eggs 1 at a time, beating until combined before adding the next egg.

4.  Gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture, beating at low speed until just blended after each addition. Stir in vanilla.

5.  Pour the batter into a greased and floured 10-inch Bundt pan, or parchment lined cake tins (if using).  Bake for 1 hour and 40 minutes, or until a wooden skewer inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 10 to 15 minutes, and then remove from pan and let cool completely on wire rack.

The cake went down a treat with everyone, and even though it was a bit of a shame to cut my little bunny's bum off, I loved how easy it was to slice, and that I could see each delicious layer!





If you're looking for more Easter treats to bake, why not try my colourful Mini Easter Egg Cakes baked inside of real eggs!




Tuesday, 25 March 2014

Creative Eclairs


A few years ago, and a few months after I started this blog I also started to use Google Analytics.  There was a lot to learn, but I enjoyed seeing that my baking and blogging efforts were actually being viewed by people all around the world. It was really neat to see the number of people visiting my blog each day, as well as where they came from.  My inner geek was starting to emerge!

I'll always remember when I first began to notice that people were visiting my blog after being directed to it from another blog.  Not only were people reading my blog, but they liked it enough to actually link to it!  One of the very first people to link to my blog was Ruth Clemens who writes the baking blog The Pink Whisk.  I started following Ruth's blog after that, and it wasn't long after that I realised that not only did Ruth write her blog The Pink Whisk, but she also appeared on my TV screen each week in the very first season of The Great British Bake Off.


Over the next few weeks I was captivated by Ruth's creations on the Great British Bake Off, so it came as no surprise when she was crowned runner up in the very first season.  Ruth's bakes were so different from all the other contestants, they were polished and extremely creative.  Ruth's creativeness and her passion for baking, combined with her charming personality have allowed her to publish a string of successful baking books, the most recent  titled Creative Eclairs focuses exclusively on Eclairs, and choux pastry creations. 




I'll always have a soft spot for Ruth, so I was thrilled when I received a preview copy of Creative Eclairs to review.  The book is wonderfully written, and includes loads of clear and detailed step by step photographs - something I don't think enough recipe books include.  The real highlight of the book are the recipes themselves.  There are so many unique flavour combinations to choose from, you'll be able to make a new one each week for at least 6 months!  Just have a look at the recipe index pages below.



I couldn't wait to try my hand at making eclairs.  With so many different flavours to choose from it was too hard to choose just, so I opted for two instead - original vanilla creme patisserie and the mocha creme patisserie.  Both fillings were so easy to make, and tasted absolutely delicious.  I had to restrain myself to make sure I din't eat the whole lot with a spoon!


I will admit that I didn't have instant success with the choux pastry recipe though.  Ruth's recipe calls for 4 eggs to be used in the choux pastry, but I found that my choux dough was far too runny once the 4th egg was added, even with chilling.  This resulted in flat eclairs that deflated once out of the oven.  Luckily I had the step by step photos from the book to refer to.  It was clear that piped dough in the photos was much thicker and stiffer than mine, so I tried again using only 3 eggs.  This resulted in a choux dough that was much closer in consistency to the dough pictured in the book.  I ran into a similar problem the first time I tried to make choux pastry  last year to use in my Religiuese.  I combined the instructions in Creative Eclairs together with my previous choux learnings, and I was thrilled with the way my eclairs turned out.  They were absolutely delicious, and I can't wait to try a new flavour combination.  


Vanilla Eclairs
Recipe by Ruth Clemens from the book Creative Eclairs
Adaptations are shown in pink.

Vanilla Crème Patissière

Ingredients

600ml (20fl oz) Whole Milk 
Seeds scraped from 1 Vanilla Pod, 5ml (1 tsp) vanilla bean paste or 5ml (1 tsp) vanilla extract 
100g (31⁄2oz) caster (superfine) sugar 
4 large egg yolks 
50g (13/4oz) cornflour (cornstarch)

Directions:

1. In a large jug whisk together the egg yolks and caster (superfine) sugar until the mixture is light and foamy. Add the cornflour and whisk again until of an even consistency. Set to one side.

2. Place the milk and vanilla in a medium pan and heat gently until just below boiling point. Whilst whisking the egg mixture continuously, add the warmed vanilla- infused milk a little at a time until both mixtures have been fully worked together.

3. Transfer the mixture back to the pan and over a medium heat, whisking continuously, bring to the boil. Continue to cook the crème patissière for 2 minutes until thick and glossy.

4. Remove the pan from the heat and transfer the mixture to a bowl. Contact-cover the top of the crème patissière with cling film (plastic wrap) to prevent a skin from forming, and allow to cool. Refrigerate once cooled.

5. When you are ready to use it, transfer the chilled crème patissière to a large bowl and beat with an electric hand mixer until it is a smooth and even consistency.


Basic Choux Pastry

Ingredients:

75ml (2 1⁄2fl oz) Water 
55ml (2fl oz) Whole Milk 
55g (2oz) Butter 
5ml (1 tsp) Vegetable or Sunflower Oil 
1⁄4 tsp Salt 
1 tsp Sugar 
100g (3 1⁄2oz) Plain (All-Purpose) Flour 
4 Large Eggs *I used 3
Sunflower or vegetable oil spray

Directions:

1. Place the water, milk, butter, oil, salt and sugar in a medium pan. Heat over a medium heat stirring frequently until the butter has melted. Bring to the boil and add the flour.  With the pan still on the heat, beat the mixture with a wooden spoon until it comes together into a ball.

2. Turn the heat down to low and continue to mix over the heat for 3 minutes.This helps to reduce any excess moisture and changes the paste from a rough shaggy texture to a much smoother, glossy paste. Remove from the heat and allow to stand for 2 minutes to cool slightly.

3. Add the eggs one at a time, beating the choux well after each addition until all the eggs have been incorporated. Continue to mix until the consistency returns to a smooth, glossy texture before adding the next egg.

When all the eggs have been incorporated, the choux pastry will be glossy with a thick, medium-firm texture.  Transfer to a bowl and cover with cling film (plastic wrap). Allow to cool fully then refrigerate for at least 1 hour. This makes the choux pastry much easier to pipe neatly.

4.  Once chilled, transfer the choux pastry to a piping (pastry) bag fitted with an 18mm (3⁄4in) piping nozzle (tip). A serrated pen (French style) nozzle (tip) is ideal for éclairs as it creates ridges in the piped éclairs which allow the dough to expand evenly on baking, avoiding any cracking across the top. *I couldn't find my serrated nozzle (only the Wilton 1M tip which is too deep) so instead I ran a fork lightly down the piped eclairs. This worked great.

5. Preheat the oven to 160°C (fan) /180°C /350°F/ Gas Mark 4.  Pipe the choux pastry into éclairs or choux buns of the desired size using an even pressure to keep the width of each éclair the same.  Any peaks or misshapen ends can be smoothed with a dampened finger once piped.

6.  Spray the éclairs lightly with a vegetable or sunflower oil. This light coating prevents the crust from forming on the éclairs too early in the baking process, allows the choux pastry to expand evenly, and helps prevent the top of the finished éclair from cracking.  Bake for 40 - 50 minutes until golden brown.  Transfer to a wire rack and allow to cool completely.


To Assemble the Eclairs:

1. Pierce the base of the éclair once at each end using a small piping nozzle (tip) (for larger 15cm/6in éclairs, also pierce a hole in the middle of the base).

2. Add the filling to a piping (pastry) bag fitted with a filling tip – these are also known as Bismarck tips or cupcake filler nozzles (tips), such as Wilton 230.

3. Insert the filler nozzle (tip) into the pierced hole at one end and squeeze in the filling gently. Remove the tip and place it into the hole at the opposite end and fill again, just until you see a little movement of the filling at the hole in the opposite end.

4. Clean off any excess filling from the base of the éclair with your fingertip or by swiping it across the lip of a small jug.

5. Place the warmed liquid fondant (recipe below) in a shallow open bowl – big enough to fit the length of the éclair easily.  Dip the top of the éclair into the mixture. Then with one end leading and the rest following, moving in an arc to remove it from the bowl and allow the excess to drain from one end.  

If you're adding any sprinkles on top like I did, make sure to sprinkle them on immediately after dipping your eclair into the fondant before.  If you wait too long, the glaze will set and the sprinkles won't stick. Place each éclair onto a wire rack, glazed-side up to set.


Fondant Glaze

Ingredients:

300g (10 1⁄2oz) White Sugarpaste (Fondant / ready-to-roll icing) 
30ml (2 tbsp) water
*I added a tiny amount of pink colouring, and 2 squares of white chocolate which made the fondant glaze more opaque.

1. Break the fondant into small pieces and place in heatproof bowl with the water. *I added my colouring and white chocolate in this step.

2. Heat gently in the microwave in short bursts, or over a pan of steaming water, stirring frequently, until the fondant melts.

3. Mix with an electric mixer until the consistency is smooth and even and no lumps remain.The glaze will begin to set while it cools, so use while it is still warm. It can easily be reheated to pouring consistency if it cools too quickly for use.


To celebrate the launch of Creative Eclairs a special blog hop is currently taking place.  Why not check out some of the other blogs participating to see what they made? A full list of the blogs taking place can be found here.

Creative Eclairs is available for early purchase now through the Stitch Craft Create website now for  £13.84, and will be available through Amazon UK here when it's officially released the 25th of April.

If you're in the USA, Creative Eclairs is available now for $12.63 though Amazon.com here 

Creative Eclairs


A few years ago, and a few months after I started this blog I also started to use Google Analytics.  There was a lot to learn, but I enjoyed seeing that my baking and blogging efforts were actually being viewed by people all around the world. It was really neat to see the number of people visiting my blog each day, as well as where they came from.  My inner geek was starting to emerge!

I'll always remember when I first began to notice that people were visiting my blog after being directed to it from another blog.  Not only were people reading my blog, but they liked it enough to actually link to it!  One of the very first people to link to my blog was Ruth Clemens who writes the baking blog The Pink Whisk.  I started following Ruth's blog after that, and it wasn't long after that I realised that not only did Ruth write her blog The Pink Whisk, but she also appeared on my TV screen each week in the very first season of The Great British Bake Off.


Over the next few weeks I was captivated by Ruth's creations on the Great British Bake Off, so it came as no surprise when she was crowned runner up in the very first season.  Ruth's bakes were so different from all the other contestants, they were polished and extremely creative.  Ruth's creativeness and her passion for baking, combined with her charming personality have allowed her to publish a string of successful baking books, the most recent  titled Creative Eclairs focuses exclusively on Eclairs, and choux pastry creations. 




I'll always have a soft spot for Ruth, so I was thrilled when I received a preview copy of Creative Eclairs to review.  The book is wonderfully written, and includes loads of clear and detailed step by step photographs - something I don't think enough recipe books include.  The real highlight of the book are the recipes themselves.  There are so many unique flavour combinations to choose from, you'll be able to make a new one each week for at least 6 months!  Just have a look at the recipe index pages below.



I couldn't wait to try my hand at making eclairs.  With so many different flavours to choose from it was too hard to choose just, so I opted for two instead - original vanilla creme patisserie and the mocha creme patisserie.  Both fillings were so easy to make, and tasted absolutely delicious.  I had to restrain myself to make sure I din't eat the whole lot with a spoon!


I will admit that I didn't have instant success with the choux pastry recipe though.  Ruth's recipe calls for 4 eggs to be used in the choux pastry, but I found that my choux dough was far too runny once the 4th egg was added, even with chilling.  This resulted in flat eclairs that deflated once out of the oven.  Luckily I had the step by step photos from the book to refer to.  It was clear that piped dough in the photos was much thicker and stiffer than mine, so I tried again using only 3 eggs.  This resulted in a choux dough that was much closer in consistency to the dough pictured in the book.  I ran into a similar problem the first time I tried to make choux pastry  last year to use in my Religiuese.  I combined the instructions in Creative Eclairs together with my previous choux learnings, and I was thrilled with the way my eclairs turned out.  They were absolutely delicious, and I can't wait to try a new flavour combination.  


Vanilla Eclairs
Recipe by Ruth Clemens from the book Creative Eclairs
Adaptations are shown in pink.

Vanilla Crème Patissière

Ingredients

600ml (20fl oz) Whole Milk 
Seeds scraped from 1 Vanilla Pod, 5ml (1 tsp) vanilla bean paste or 5ml (1 tsp) vanilla extract 
100g (31⁄2oz) caster (superfine) sugar 
4 large egg yolks 
50g (13/4oz) cornflour (cornstarch)

Directions:

1. In a large jug whisk together the egg yolks and caster (superfine) sugar until the mixture is light and foamy. Add the cornflour and whisk again until of an even consistency. Set to one side.

2. Place the milk and vanilla in a medium pan and heat gently until just below boiling point. Whilst whisking the egg mixture continuously, add the warmed vanilla- infused milk a little at a time until both mixtures have been fully worked together.

3. Transfer the mixture back to the pan and over a medium heat, whisking continuously, bring to the boil. Continue to cook the crème patissière for 2 minutes until thick and glossy.

4. Remove the pan from the heat and transfer the mixture to a bowl. Contact-cover the top of the crème patissière with cling film (plastic wrap) to prevent a skin from forming, and allow to cool. Refrigerate once cooled.

5. When you are ready to use it, transfer the chilled crème patissière to a large bowl and beat with an electric hand mixer until it is a smooth and even consistency.


Basic Choux Pastry

Ingredients:

75ml (2 1⁄2fl oz) Water 
55ml (2fl oz) Whole Milk 
55g (2oz) Butter 
5ml (1 tsp) Vegetable or Sunflower Oil 
1⁄4 tsp Salt 
1 tsp Sugar 
100g (3 1⁄2oz) Plain (All-Purpose) Flour 
4 Large Eggs *I used 3
Sunflower or vegetable oil spray

Directions:

1. Place the water, milk, butter, oil, salt and sugar in a medium pan. Heat over a medium heat stirring frequently until the butter has melted. Bring to the boil and add the flour.  With the pan still on the heat, beat the mixture with a wooden spoon until it comes together into a ball.

2. Turn the heat down to low and continue to mix over the heat for 3 minutes.This helps to reduce any excess moisture and changes the paste from a rough shaggy texture to a much smoother, glossy paste. Remove from the heat and allow to stand for 2 minutes to cool slightly.

3. Add the eggs one at a time, beating the choux well after each addition until all the eggs have been incorporated. Continue to mix until the consistency returns to a smooth, glossy texture before adding the next egg.

When all the eggs have been incorporated, the choux pastry will be glossy with a thick, medium-firm texture.  Transfer to a bowl and cover with cling film (plastic wrap). Allow to cool fully then refrigerate for at least 1 hour. This makes the choux pastry much easier to pipe neatly.

4.  Once chilled, transfer the choux pastry to a piping (pastry) bag fitted with an 18mm (3⁄4in) piping nozzle (tip). A serrated pen (French style) nozzle (tip) is ideal for éclairs as it creates ridges in the piped éclairs which allow the dough to expand evenly on baking, avoiding any cracking across the top. *I couldn't find my serrated nozzle (only the Wilton 1M tip which is too deep) so instead I ran a fork lightly down the piped eclairs. This worked great.

5. Preheat the oven to 160°C (fan) /180°C /350°F/ Gas Mark 4.  Pipe the choux pastry into éclairs or choux buns of the desired size using an even pressure to keep the width of each éclair the same.  Any peaks or misshapen ends can be smoothed with a dampened finger once piped.

6.  Spray the éclairs lightly with a vegetable or sunflower oil. This light coating prevents the crust from forming on the éclairs too early in the baking process, allows the choux pastry to expand evenly, and helps prevent the top of the finished éclair from cracking.  Bake for 40 - 50 minutes until golden brown.  Transfer to a wire rack and allow to cool completely.


To Assemble the Eclairs:

1. Pierce the base of the éclair once at each end using a small piping nozzle (tip) (for larger 15cm/6in éclairs, also pierce a hole in the middle of the base).

2. Add the filling to a piping (pastry) bag fitted with a filling tip – these are also known as Bismarck tips or cupcake filler nozzles (tips), such as Wilton 230.

3. Insert the filler nozzle (tip) into the pierced hole at one end and squeeze in the filling gently. Remove the tip and place it into the hole at the opposite end and fill again, just until you see a little movement of the filling at the hole in the opposite end.

4. Clean off any excess filling from the base of the éclair with your fingertip or by swiping it across the lip of a small jug.

5. Place the warmed liquid fondant (recipe below) in a shallow open bowl – big enough to fit the length of the éclair easily.  Dip the top of the éclair into the mixture. Then with one end leading and the rest following, moving in an arc to remove it from the bowl and allow the excess to drain from one end.  

If you're adding any sprinkles on top like I did, make sure to sprinkle them on immediately after dipping your eclair into the fondant before.  If you wait too long, the glaze will set and the sprinkles won't stick. Place each éclair onto a wire rack, glazed-side up to set.


Fondant Glaze

Ingredients:

300g (10 1⁄2oz) White Sugarpaste (Fondant / ready-to-roll icing) 
30ml (2 tbsp) water
*I added a tiny amount of pink colouring, and 2 squares of white chocolate which made the fondant glaze more opaque.

1. Break the fondant into small pieces and place in heatproof bowl with the water. *I added my colouring and white chocolate in this step.

2. Heat gently in the microwave in short bursts, or over a pan of steaming water, stirring frequently, until the fondant melts.

3. Mix with an electric mixer until the consistency is smooth and even and no lumps remain.The glaze will begin to set while it cools, so use while it is still warm. It can easily be reheated to pouring consistency if it cools too quickly for use.


To celebrate the launch of Creative Eclairs a special blog hop is currently taking place.  Why not check out some of the other blogs participating to see what they made? A full list of the blogs taking place can be found here.

Creative Eclairs is available for early purchase now through the Stitch Craft Create website now for  £13.84, and will be available through Amazon UK here when it's officially released the 25th of April.

If you're in the USA, Creative Eclairs is available now for $12.63 though Amazon.com here 

Friday, 14 February 2014

Valentine's Day Quilted Heart Cookies


Over the past few years I've acquired a fair amount of baking and decorating paraphernalia.  OK, quite a lot may be an understatement.  It's actually case loads. I've got good intentions to use it all, but the reality is I rarely have time to sit down anymore and have a play around with all my decorating tools. 


Luckily for me there was a day this week when the stars aligned and what seemed like the impossible was actually possible. I've wanted to make fondant topped sugar cookies for ages now, so Valentine's Day was the perfect excuse to make some pretty heart cookies.  

I whipped up a batch of cookies using my favourite recipe (here), and tinted my fondant while I waited for them to bake. After rooting around for a few minutes in one of my decorating boxes, I pulled out a quilted patchwork cutter, and a set of fondant crimpers.  I hadn't used either of these before so was a bit unsure how to actually use each of them but they were pretty easy to figure out.


The patchwork cutter (here) is really simple to use, and produced a really pretty effect.  I can see it quickly becoming one of my favourite tolls to use with fondant. Simply press the cutter firmly in the fondant, making sure to to press evenly all over the cutter and then gently lift up. Cut out a piece of the patterned fondant using the same (but clean) cookie cutter as you did with the cookies.  Once your cookies are out of the oven and cooled, brush a little water on the back of your fondant shapes (this acts just like glue) and gently press them on top of your cookies.  Leave them aside for an hour or so for the fondant to stiffen up.


The fondant crimpers took a bit of getting used to. I wasn't even sure if I was going to use them, so tested them on  piece of rolled fondant first, and was pleasantly surprised with the results.  The crimpers (similar to these) produced a really delicate frilly design, so I used them to work my way around the outer edge of the fondant heart, and then back around the inside to add a second frilly row.

It was my first time making fondant topped cookies, and using the tools too create the different effects. As is the case with most of the things I bake, I'm taking these into the office so they're not staring me in the face every moment of the day waiting for me to gobble them up.  But I did save a few of them so I could make a special batch of blue hearts for my two Valentines that will be home today.   

Happy Valentine's Day


 

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